Financial Education

The Finance Authority of Maine (FAME) has created a variety of free resources and tools designed to assist students, parents and educators with understanding the important elements of successful money management.

 

Financial Education Resources

Elementary Coloring Book Series and Elementary Coloring Book Teaching Guide
Featuring FAME’s Cash & Max, this three-part series of coloring books was created to introduce elementary students (ideally grades K-2) with three key concepts; career exploration, education after high school and money management.

 

Elementary Workbook and Elementary Workbook Teaching Guide

This three-part series of workbooks was created to introduce elementary students (ideally grades three through five) with three key concepts; career exploration, education after high school and money management.

 

FAME Money Management Tool Kit

This booklet was designed to provide valuable money management information to high school, college students and adults and focuses on an eight-step approach to financial success.

 

Claim Your Future™ (formerly Get a Life)
FAME’s Claim Your Future game is an interactive financial literacy game created primarily for middle school and high school students. Through this game, students learn about potential career options, college aspirations and financial education; including budgeting, wants vs. needs and making choices.

 

Career Search
FAME's Career Search allows students to find careers that match their personality traits or to simply review a particular career to assess compatibility with their interests. Select from the options below to get started with your search!

 

FAME Money Management Presentations –

“Get a Life” Financial Literacy Game

Financial Literacy 101

 

Calculators and Tools

Use these interactive online calculators to help you manage your money.

 

FAME Quick Tips

One-page fact sheets that provide useful tips and information related to financial aid and money management. Each fact sheet is created as a PDF for easy printing and distribution.

    

Steps to Financial Success

Learning how to manage your money is an important step toward taking control of your life. Understanding where your money is coming from and where it’s going is critical to help ensure that you achieve your life’s goals. It is never too early (or too late) to improve your money management skills.

Maine-Based Financial Education Resources

Financial Education Services Clearinghouse

Maine Jump$tart Coalition

 

Additional Financial Education Resources

Budgeting

Bankrate.com
EducationQuest Foundation
Mapping Your Future

 

Credit Bureaus
Equifax
Experian
TransUnion

 

Credit Card Advice and Calculators
Bankrate.com
Consumer Protection
Fair Isaac Corporation
Federal Reserve
Using Credit Cards Wisely
Truth About Credit
VISA Practical Money Skills

 

Foreign Exchange

Currency Converter

 

Higher Education Tax Benefits

Opportunity Maine Income Tax Credit
Federal Tax for Higher Education

 

Money Management Advice

Bankrate.com

MyMoney.gov

National Foundation for Credit Counseling

Practical Money Skills

Young Money

 

Savings

www.americasaves.org

www.collegeboard.com/student/pay

www.collegesavings.org

www.savingforcollege.com

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News of Interest

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  • Thursday, October 09, 2014 10:52 AM

    The Finance Authority of Maine (FAME) is pleased to announce a statewide expansion of the SALT program in Maine. Created by American Student Assistance (ASA), SALT is an innovative program designed to empower college students and alumni to confidently approach, manage, and pay back their student loans while gaining financial skills for life. 

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  • Monday, October 06, 2014 10:53 AM

    The Finance Authority of Maine (FAME) continues to maintain impressively low cohort default rates for Maine student loan borrowers. According to data recently released by the U.S. Department of Education, FAME’s federal Fiscal Year 2011 three-year cohort default rate was 7.1 percent of borrowers.

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